prettyfarmpic.jpg

Across the United States, there are nearly 3,000 Conservation Districts.  All of these districts share the same goal:  to coordinate assistance from public, private, local, state, and federal sources to develop locally driven solutions to natural resource concerns. 

During the Dust Bowl of the 1930s, Congress realized that something needed to be done to stop the destruction of the soil.  They realized that since three-quarters of the continental United States was privately owned, these efforts required active, voluntary support from private landowners in order to be successful.  Organized efforts to control soil erosion began in 1935. 

In 1941, when the Queen Anne's Soil Conservation District was organized, agriculture was the dominant land use, but suburban and urban areas are continuing to spread.  The District provides a comprehensive education and information program directed toward all citizens-both urban and rural-which looks at human impacts on the environment and how people can lessen those impacts.  Due to the explosive growth of the Kent Island area, the District's urban responsibilities have multiplied dramatically in recent years.  Consequently, the District now has the growing responsibilities of reviewing erosion and sediment control plans, approving stormwater management plans, and addressing urban growth issues. 

For more than half a century, the District has worked to encourage landowners to see themselves as stewards of the land, with a responsibility to pass their property on to future generations in a better state than that in which it was received. 

 

Our Mission

Located on Maryland's Eastern Shore, the Queen Anne's Soil Conservation District serves a predominantly agricultural region.  Corn, soybeans, and small grains are the primary agricultural products.  Vegetables, poultry, beef and dairy cattle, and equine operations comprise the remaining agricultural makeup of the area.  The District provides a comprehensive education and information program directed towards all citizens -both urban and rural- which emphasizes human impacts on the environment and how people can lessen these impacts.  Due to the explosive growth of the Kent Island area, the District's urban responsibilities have multiplied drastically.  Consequently, the District has the growing responsibilities of reviewing erosion and sediment control plans, and addressing urban growth issues.